CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORIES LIFTED FOR HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR, BROWNLEE RESERVOIR AND LAKE LOWELL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORIES LIFTED FOR HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR, BROWNLEE RESERVOIR AND LAKE LOWELL

 Southwest District Health, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory issued on August 8, 2022 for Hells Canyon Reservoir, the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory issued on August 5, 2022 for Brownlee Reservoir, and the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory issued on September 2, 2022 for Lake Lowell. While there may still be some ongoing cyanobacteria presence, the recreation season has ended and risk of human exposure has been greatly reduced. DEQ officials monitor cyanobacteria and associated toxins where cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (HABs) are present. A recent sample from Hells Canyon Reservoir on October 14th was below the human recreation threshold for microcystin. A second confirmation sample was not collected. Samples were not collected from Brownlee Reservoir or Lake Lowell.

Other blooms may exist on these waterbodies that have not been reported to DEQ or the public health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550.

It is best to avoid direct contact with water affected by a bloom. If you choose to fish in a potentially affected waterbody, wear protective clothing such as gloves or waders, and wash your hands thoroughly with clean water. There have been no reports of people becoming sick from eating fish caught during a bloom. Information about the risk of eating fish from affected waters is limited. However, fish fillets are less likely to accumulate toxins compared to other parts of the fish. If you decide to eat fish from affected waters remove the fat, skin, and organs before cooking or freezing, and only eat the muscle tissue. Avoid cutting into organs. Rinse the fillets with clean water before cooking or freezing.

Dogs are more likely to be exposed to cyanotoxins from drinking contaminated water, swallowing water while swimming and retrieving a ball or stick, and from licking cyanobacteria from their fur. Some animals will be exposed by eating mats of cyanobacteria or dead animals, such as fish, found near the bloom or by retrieving waterfowl that might have cyanobacteria on their feathers after swimming through a bloom. Carry clean, potable water for your dogs to drink when recreating around a body of water with a cyanobacterial bloom and keep them on-leash if they can’t resist eating tempting items. If your dog comes into contact with suspicious water immediately wash the dog off with clean water. Call your veterinarian, or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 or the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-764-7661 (note there is a fee for these calls).

The public is advised to use caution as harmful blooms may still persist. Humans and their pets should stay out if in doubt to the presence of harmful blooms.

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/ or DHW’s website at https://www.gethealthy.dhw.idaho.gov/recreational-water-health-advisories.

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Media Contacts:

DEQ media contacts:     

Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

Dani Terhaar
208.373.0274
Dani.Terhaar@deq.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:   

Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED FOR CJ STRIKE RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED  FOR CJ STRIKE RESERVOIR

Southwest District Health, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory issued on July 19, 2022 for CJ Strike Reservoir.

DEQ officials monitor cyanobacteria and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) are present and have confirmed that cyanobacteria levels at CJ Strike Reservoir have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.

Other blooms may exist on these waterbodies that have not been reported to DEQ or the public health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550.

For more information related to current recreational water quality health advisories, visit https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms.

# # #

Media Contacts:

DEQ media contacts:     

Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

Dani Terhaar
208.373.0274
Dani.Terhaar@deq.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:   

Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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Health advisory issued for LAKE LOWELL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Health advisory issued for LAKE LOWELL

Based on Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) testing and Idaho’s public health advisory guidelines, Southwest District Health (SWDH) is issuing a health advisory for Lake Lowell. Southwest District Health urges residents to use caution when recreating in or near the water. Recent samples taken from Lake Lowell indicate high concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Those with liver or kidney damage are at an increased risk of illness.

When recreating near or in Lake Lowell, take the following precautions while the advisory is in effect:

  • Avoid swimming, wading, or other activities in the water. Take extra precautions to ensure children, pets, and livestock are not exposed to the water. Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom. Boiling and filtering the water does not remove the toxins and can increase the risk of adverse health effects.
  • Wash hands thoroughly in clean water after handling fish caught in water experiencing a bloom. Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched. Clean and wash fish thoroughly in uncontaminated water and dispose of internal organs before consumption. If you choose to eat fish from this area, filet the fish and remove all fat, skin, and organs before cooking.
  • Clean skin or pet fur with clean water as soon as possible after any water contact.

No updates will be provided until DEQ testing reveals toxins are below the health standard. The public will be advised when it is likely the concern no longer exists.

Symptoms of cyanotoxin exposure include rashes, hives, diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, and/or wheezing. More severe symptoms affecting the liver and nervous system may result from ingesting water. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare provider.

Pets, livestock, and wildlife can get sick, or even die, within minutes to days after cyanotoxin exposure. Dogs are often the first affected because they are more likely to swim in or drink contaminated water or lick contaminated water or bloom material off their fur. If your pets or livestock have been in the water, immediately wash them with clean water to keep them from licking cyanobacteria off their bodies. Seek veterinary care immediately if your pets or livestock seem sick after going in or drinking the water.

Cyanobacteria are a natural part of Idaho’s water bodies. When temperatures rise, their populations can bloom and toxic chemical compounds, or cyanotoxins, can be released into the water. Blooms can vary in appearance, and may look like mats, foam, spilled paint, or surface scum, and have a foul odor. Southwest District Health works closely with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (DHW) and the DEQ in identifying, responding to, and monitoring cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (HABS).

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/ or DHW’s website at https://www.gethealthy.dhw.idaho.gov/recreational-water-health-advisories.

# # #

Media Contacts:

DEQ media contact:
Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

DHW media contact:
Greg Stahl
208.334.0668
Greg.Stahl@dhw.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:
Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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Health advisory issued for HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Health advisory issued for HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR

Based on Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) testing and Idaho’s public health advisory guidelines, Southwest District Health (SWDH) is issuing a health advisory for Hells Canyon Reservoir. SWDH urges residents to use caution when recreating in or near the water. Recent samples taken from “Big Bar” at the Hells Canyon water body indicate high concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Those with liver or kidney damage are at an increased risk of illness.

When recreating near or in Hells Canyon Reservoir, take the following precautions while the advisory is in effect:

  • Avoid swimming, wading, or other activities in the water. Take extra precautions to ensure children, pets, and livestock are not exposed to the water. Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom. Boiling and filtering the water does not remove the toxins and can increase the risk of adverse health effects.
  • Wash hands thoroughly in clean water after handling fish caught in water experiencing a bloom. Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched. Clean and wash fish thoroughly in uncontaminated water and dispose of internal organs before consumption. If you choose to eat fish from this area, filet the fish and remove all fat, skin, and organs before cooking.
  • Clean skin or pet fur with clean water as soon as possible after any water contact.

No updates will be provided until DEQ testing reveals toxins are below the health standard. The public will be advised when it is likely the concern no longer exists.

Symptoms of cyanotoxin exposure include rashes, hives, diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, and/or wheezing. More severe symptoms affecting the liver and nervous system may result from ingesting water. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare provider.

Pets, livestock, and wildlife can get sick, or even die, within minutes to days after cyanotoxin exposure. Dogs are often the first affected because they are more likely to swim in or drink contaminated water or lick contaminated water or bloom material off their fur. If your pets or livestock have been in the water, immediately wash them with clean water to keep them from licking cyanobacteria off their bodies. Seek veterinary care immediately if your pets or livestock seem sick after going in or drinking the water.

Cyanobacteria are a natural part of Idaho’s water bodies. When temperatures rise, their populations can bloom and toxic chemical compounds, or cyanotoxins, can be released into the water. Blooms can vary in appearance, and may look like mats, foam, spilled paint, or surface scum, and have a foul odor. SWDH works closely with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (DHW) and the DEQ in identifying, responding to, and monitoring cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (HABS).

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/ or DHW’s website at https://www.gethealthy.dhw.idaho.gov/recreational-water-health-advisories.

# # #

Media Contacts:

DEQ media contact:
Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

DHW media contact:
Greg Stahl
208.334.0668
Greg.Stahl@dhw.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:
Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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Health advisory issued for BROWNLEE RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Health advisory issued for BROWNLEE RESERVOIR

Based on Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) testing and Idaho’s public health advisory guidelines, Southwest District Health (SWDH) is issuing a health advisory for Brownlee Reservoir. SWDH urges residents to use caution when recreating in or near the water. Recent samples taken from the water body indicate high concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Those with liver or kidney damage are at an increased risk of illness.

When recreating near or in Brownlee Reservoir, take the following precautions while the advisory is in effect:

  • Avoid swimming, wading, or other activities in the water. Take extra precautions to ensure children, pets, and livestock are not exposed to the water. Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom. Boiling and filtering the water does not remove the toxins and can increase the risk of adverse health effects.
  • Wash hands thoroughly in clean water after handling fish caught in water experiencing a bloom. Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched. Clean and wash fish thoroughly in uncontaminated water and dispose of internal organs before consumption. If you choose to eat fish from this area, filet the fish and remove all fat, skin, and organs before cooking.
  • Clean skin or pet fur with clean water as soon as possible after any water contact.

The public will be advised when it is likely the concern no longer exists.

Symptoms of cyanotoxin exposure include rashes, hives, diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, and/or wheezing. More severe symptoms affecting the liver and nervous system may result from ingesting water. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare provider.

Pets, livestock, and wildlife can get sick, or even die, within minutes to days after cyanotoxin exposure. Dogs are often the first affected because they are more likely to swim in or drink contaminated water or lick contaminated water or bloom material off their fur. If your pets or livestock have been in the water, immediately wash them with clean water to keep them from licking cyanobacteria off their bodies. Seek veterinary care immediately if your pets or livestock seem sick after going in or drinking the water.

Cyanobacteria are a natural part of Idaho’s water bodies. When temperatures rise, their populations can bloom and toxic chemical compounds, or cyanotoxins, can be released into the water. Blooms can vary in appearance, and may look like mats, foam, spilled paint, or surface scum, and have a foul odor. SWDH works closely with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (DHW) and the DEQ in identifying, responding to, and monitoring cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (HABS).

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/ or DHW’s website at https://www.gethealthy.dhw.idaho.gov/recreational-water-health-advisories.

# # #

Media Contacts:

DEQ media contact:
Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

DHW media contact:
Greg Stahl
208.334.0668
Greg.Stahl@dhw.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:
Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

Read More

Health advisory issued for CJ STRIKE RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Health advisory issued for CJ STRIKE RESERVOIR                                          

Based on Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) testing and Idaho’s public health advisory guidelines, Southwest District Health (SWDH) is issuing a health advisory for CJ Strike Reservoir. SWDH urges residents to use caution when recreating in or near the water. Recent samples taken from the water body indicate high concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Those with liver or kidney damage are at an increased risk of illness.

When recreating near or in CJ Strike Reservoir, take the following precautions while the advisory is in effect:

  • Avoid swimming, wading, or other activities in the water. Take extra precautions to ensure children, pets, and livestock are not exposed to the water. Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom. Boiling and filtering the water does not remove the toxins and can increase the risk of adverse health effects.
  • Wash hands thoroughly in clean water after handling fish caught in water experiencing a bloom. Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched. Clean and wash fish thoroughly in uncontaminated water and dispose of internal organs before consumption. If you choose to eat fish from this area, filet the fish and remove all fat, skin, and organs before cooking.
  • Clean skin or pet fur with clean water as soon as possible after any water contact.

The public will be advised when it is likely the concern no longer exists.

Symptoms of cyanotoxin exposure include rashes, hives, diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, and/or wheezing. More severe symptoms affecting the liver and nervous system may result from ingesting water. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare provider.

Pets, livestock, and wildlife can get sick, or even die, within minutes to days after cyanotoxin exposure. Dogs are often the first affected because they are more likely to swim in or drink contaminated water or lick contaminated water or bloom material off their fur. If your pets or livestock have been in the water, immediately wash them with clean water to keep them from licking cyanobacteria off their bodies. Seek veterinary care immediately if your pets or livestock seem sick after going in or drinking the water.

Cyanobacteria are a natural part of Idaho’s water bodies. When temperatures rise, their populations can bloom and toxic chemical compounds, or cyanotoxins, can be released into the water. Blooms can vary in appearance, and may look like mats, foam, spilled paint, or surface scum, and have a foul odor. SWDH works closely with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) and the DEQ in identifying, responding to, and monitoring cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (HABS).

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/ or IDHW’s website at https://www.gethealthy.dhw.idaho.gov/recreational-water-health-advisories.

# # #

Media Contacts:

DEQ media contact:
Anna Marron
208.373.0427
Anna.Marron@deq.idaho.gov

IDHW media contact:
Niki Forbing-Orr
208.334.0668
Niki.Forbing-Orr@dhw.idaho.gov

SWDH media contacts:
Ashley Anderson
208.455.5413
Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov

Katrina Williams
208.455.5317
Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

Read More

BLUE-GREEN ALGAE HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED FOR LAKE LOWELL

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BLUE-GREEN ALGAE HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED FOR LAKE LOWELL             

CALDWELL, IDAHO – Southwest District Health—in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)—has lifted the health advisory for Lake Lowell. The advisory was issued in August 2021. 

DEQ officials monitor blue-green algae and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) are present and have confirmed that blue-green algae levels in Lake Lowell have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.  

Other blooms may exist on this water body that have not been reported to DEQ or the health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime, surface scum, or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing blue-green algae may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550. 

For more information related to current recreational water quality health advisories, visit https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms.

# # #

Media Contacts: 
Ashley Anderson           Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov
Katrina Williams            Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED FOR HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR AND BROWNLEE RESERVOIR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CYANOBACTERIA PUBLIC HEALTH ADVISORY LIFTED FOR HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR AND BROWNLEE RESERVOIR              

CALDWELL, IDAHO – Southwest District Health, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), has lifted the Cyanobacteria Health Advisory issued on August 6, 2021, for Hells Canyon Reservoir and Brownlee Reservoir.

DEQ officials monitor cyanobacteria and associated toxins where harmful algal blooms (HABs) are present and have confirmed that cyanobacteria levels at Hells Canyon Reservoir and Brownlee Reservoir have returned to normal and toxin levels are below the safety threshold.

Other blooms may exist on these waterbodies that have not been reported to DEQ or the public health district. Water users should always exercise caution around water bodies with visible slime or surface scum or a foul odor. High concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria may cause illness to both humans and animals. Report any concerns to DEQ at 208.373.0550.

For more information related to current recreational water quality health advisories, visit https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms.

  

# # #

Media Contacts: 

DEQ media contact:
Chase Cusack                Chase.Cusack@deq.idaho.gov 

Southwest District Health contacts:
Ashley Anderson           Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov
Katrina Williams            Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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Health advisories issued for Lake Lowell, Hells Canyon Reservoir and Brownlee Reservoir

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Health advisories issued for Lake Lowell, Hells Canyon Reservoir and Brownlee Reservoir                                             

CALDWELL, IDAHO – Southwest District Health (SWDH) and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) are issuing health advisories for LAKE LOWELL, HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR and BROWNLEE RESERVOIR, urging residents to use caution when recreating in or near the water.  

Recent samples taken from the water bodies indicate high concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Those with liver or kidney damage are at an increased risk of illness. 

Cyanobacteria are a natural part of Idaho’s water bodies. When temperatures rise, their populations can bloom and toxic chemical compounds, or cyanotoxins, can be released into the water. Blooms can vary in appearance, and may look like mats, foam, spilled paint, or surface scum, and have a foul odor. 

When recreating near or in LAKE LOWELL, HELLS CANYON RESERVOIR and BROWNLEE RESERVOIR, take the following precautions while the advisory is in effect: 

  • Avoid swimming, wading, or other activities. Take extra precautions to ensure children, pets, and livestock are not exposed to the water. 
  • Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom. Boiling and filtering the water can increase the risk. 
  • Wash your hands thoroughly after handling fish caught in water experiencing a bloom. Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched. Any fish caught should be cleaned and washed thoroughly in uncontaminated water and any internal organs disposed of before consumption. If people choose to eat fish from this area, filet the fish and remove all of the fat, skin, and organs before cooking.  
  • Clean with potable water as soon as possible if water contacts skin or pet fur. 

Symptoms of cyanotoxin exposure include rashes, hives, diarrhea, vomiting, coughing, and/or wheezing. More severe symptoms affecting the liver and nervous system may result from ingesting water. If symptoms persist, consult your healthcare provider.  

The public will be advised when it is likely the concern no longer exists.  

For more information about harmful algal blooms, visit DEQ’s website at https://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality/surface-water/cyanobacteria-harmful-algal-blooms/  

# # #

Media Contacts: 

DEQ media contact:
Chase Cusack                Chase.Cusack@deq.idaho.gov 

Southwest District Health contacts:
Ashley Anderson           Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov
Katrina Williams            Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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Southwest District Health Issues Excessive Heat Public Health Advisory for Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, and Washington Counties

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Southwest District Health Issues Excessive Heat Public Health Advisory for Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, and Washington Counties                                                   

CALDWELL, IDAHO – Southwest District Health is issuing an excessive heat public health advisory while temperatures exceed 100 degrees for consecutive days in the coming week. A heat advisory means that a period of hot temperatures is expected. Heat is the #1 weather-related killer in the United States. Be safe!

Health Impacts of Extreme Heat

Heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and heat stresses are not uncommon during extremely hot temperatures. In fact, heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. Infants and children, older adults (over the age of 65 years), people with chronic conditions and individuals who work outdoors may be more prone to some form of heat stress. Heat stroke occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Signs and symptoms of heat stroke vary but may include the following:

  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to hot temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion vary but may include the following:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Skin: may be cool and moist
  • Pulse rate: fast and weak
  • Breathing: fast and shallow

In the coming days:

  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Seek cooler locations during the day if no air conditioning is available.
  • Limit physical activity
  • Limit exposure to the sun (particularly between 10am-6pm when heat is most powerful)
  • Apply sunscreen, at least SPF 30, at least 20 minutes before going outside.
  • Check on those who might be prone to heat sensitivities.
  • Look before you lock! Never leave children, elderly persons, or pets unattended in enclosed vehicles even for a short time.
  • Keep your A/C regularly maintained and take precautions.
  • Prepare for a power outage (everyone’s A/C is running overtime and might cause a power outage).
  • Play in the water! Turn on your sprinklers! Fill the kiddie pool!
  • Avoid using the oven, plan for meals that do not require using the oven or stovetop (careful, some appliance can raise the temperatures in the house as well as other electronics that are plugged in but not in use).

More resources:

Learn more about extreme heat: https://www.ready.gov/heat

CDC infographic on heat stroke vs. heat exhaustion: https://www.cdc.gov/cpr/infographics/ast-heat.htm

Idaho Power Asks Customers to Conserve Energy During Evening Hours: https://www.idahopower.com/news/idaho-power-asks-customers-to-conserve-energy-during-evening-hours/

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Media Contacts: 

Ashley Anderson           Ashley.Anderson@phd3.idaho.gov
Katrina Williams            Katrina.Williams@phd3.idaho.gov

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